Events this week

Monday, March 2

Theoretical Astrophysics Seminars
Location: UCB – 131A Campbell Hall, 12:10 p.m.
Speaker: tba
Title:  tba

Astronomy Colloquium
Location: UCB, 131A Campbell Hall, 1:30 pm
Speaker: Kevin Schlaufman (MIT)
Title: Data-Intensive Astrophysics in the 21st Century

4D Seminars
Location: UCB – 402 Old Le Conte, 2:30 p.m.
Speaker: Jeremy Mardon (Stanford)
Title: “Ultra-Light Vectors – an Inflationary Relic in the Lab”

Physics Department Colloquium
Location: UCB – 402 Old Le Conte, 2:30 p.m.
Speaker: Lindsay Glesener (SSL)
Title:
“Exploring the Sun at High Energies”

Tuesday, March 3

Berkeley Cosmology Seminars
Location: UC Berkeley, Campbell Hall, 131A, 1:10 pm
Speaker: Simeon Bird (CMU)
Title: “What Can DLAs and the Gas Around Galaxies Tell Us About Galaxy Formation?”
Abstract: The distribution and abundance of absorber systems contain a wealth of information on the way in which star formation within galaxies affects its environment. I will show how to reproduce several previously problematic properties of Damped Lyman-alpha systems, discuss their connection to metal absorbers, especially Sill and CIV, and show how the requirement to reproduce observations can act as a constraint on the imagination of theorists.

String Seminar
Location: UCB – 402 Old Le Conte, 3:40 p.m.
Speaker: Bong Soo Kim (U. of Kentucky)
Title: “Lifshitz Hydrodynamics and its Application to the Quantum Critical Region”

Physics RPM – no meeting today

Wednesday, March 4

BOSS lunch
Location: LBNL, outside – noon
Speaker: tba

Particle Theory Seminar - no seminar today

String Group Meeting
Location: UCB – 402 Old LeConte, 3:40 p.m.
Speaker: Bong Soo Kim (U. of Kentucky)
Title: “Parity Breaking Transports and Ward Identities in 2+1 Dimensions”

CANDi
Location: LBNL, 50-5026 – 3:30 PM
Discussion: sCOLA: The N-body COLA Method Extended to the Spatial Domain, Svetlin Tassev, Daniel J. Eisenstein, Benjamin D. Wandelt, Matias Zaldarriaga, ArXiv #: 1502.07751 / PAPER-64 Constraints on Reionization: The 21cm Power Spectrum at z=8.4, ArXiv #: 1502.06016, and other papers: TBA

Thursday, March 5

Astronomy Dept. Lunch
Location:  UCB, 131 Campbell Hall, 12:30 pm
Featured speakers: tba

 Astronomy Colloquium
Location: UCB, 2 LeConte Hall, 4:00 p.m.
Speaker: Daniel Weisz (U. of Washington)
Title: “Galaxy Evolution in the Resolved Universe“
Abstract: The Local Group (LG) is both a foundation and a frontier in our quest to understand the universe. Stellar evolution, the initial mass function (IMF), the extinction law, and the distance scale — all required for interpreting observations of distant galaxies — are anchored in the resolved stellar populations of our neighboring galaxies. These same observations also encode the fossil record of star formation, enabling a detailed reconstruction of the star formation histories (SFHs) of each LG galaxy across cosmic time. Such SFHs have proven particularly transformative for our understanding of the lowest-mass galaxies, which are thought to power cosmic reionization and may have properties at odds with predictions from CDM, but are undetectable in redshift surveys due to their intrinsic faintness. In this talk, I will present results from my ongoing efforts to systematically study galaxy evolution in local Universe and improve our knowledge of fundamental astrophysics (e.g., the IMF) using HST observations of hundreds of millions of resolved stars in the LG. I will highlight new insights into the early and late-time evolution of the lowest-mass galaxies and present a new measurement of the high-mass stellar IMF in M31 that is both steeper than Salpeter and more robust than any previous IMF determination. I will conclude by discussing the prospects for extending resolved stellar population studies to more distant galaxies using next-generation facilities (e.g., JWST, WFIRST) and describe powerful new ways of leveraging high-fidelity spectroscopic (e.g., Keck, TMT) and photometric observations of stars and star clusters for constraining the chemical evolution of the nearby universe across cosmic time and directly measuring the high-mass IMF in distant, star-forming galaxies.

Research Progress Meeting
Location: LBNL – 50A-5132, 4:00 p.m.
Speaker: Maria Elena Monzani (SLAC/Stanford)
Title: “First Results from the Darkside-50 Dark Matter Experiment at Gran Sasso”
Abstract: tba

Friday, March 6

INPA Seminar
Location: LBNL – INPA Common Room (50-5026), 12:00 p.m.
Speaker:  Simeon Bird (CMU)
Title:  “Simulating Massive Neutrinos”
Abstract: Massive neutrinos make up a fraction of the dark matter, but due to their large thermal velocities, cluster significantly less than cold dark matter (CDM) on small scales. An accurate theoretical modelling of their effect on structure formation is required to fully exploit large-scale structure data. I will discuss different methods to add neutrinos to cosmological simulations, finishing with one which is accurate for current cosmological mass bounds and requires minimal extra computational cost.

BCCP Seminars

Tuesday, March 10

Location: UC Berkeley, Campbell Hall, 131A, 1:10 pm
Speaker: George Becker, STSCI
Title: “A Consensus Picture of Reionization?”
Abstract: When and how the intergalactic medium (IGM) became reionized carries fundamental implications for the formation of the first stars and galaxies. New results from the Planck satellite now suggest that the bulk of reionization occurred somewhat later than previously thought, potentially easing tensions with observed galaxy populations at high redshifts. A wide range of reionization histories are still allowed, however, and it is unclear whether the simplest models truly match observations. I will present new constraints on the ionizing output from galaxies and the timing of reionization based on quasar absorption line studies of the IGM over 2 < z < 7. The results help to clarify how and when reionization ended, but also pose significant challenges to current models.

BCCP events this week

Tuesday, March 3

Location: UC Berkeley, Campbell Hall, 131A, 1:10 pm
Speaker: Simeon Bird (CMU)
Title: “What can DLAs and the Gas Around Galaxies Tell Us About Galaxy Formation?”
Abstract: The distribution and abundance of absorber systems contain a wealth of information on the way in which star formation within galaxies affects its environment. I will show how to reproduce several previously problematic properties of Damped Lyman-alpha systems, discuss their connection to metal absorbers, especially Sill and CIV, and show how the requirement to reproduce observations can act as a constraint on the imagination of theorists.

 


CTU2015 Schedule

CtU2015 registration