BCCP Seminars

Wednesday, September 17
Cosmology Talk
Location: LBNL, Director’s Conference Room (50A-5132) – 2 p.m.
Speaker: Leonardo Senatore (Stanford)
Title: “The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures”
Abstract: The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures provides a novel framework to analytically compute the clustering of the Large Scale Structures in the weakly non-linear regime in a consistent and reliable way. The theory that describes the long wavelength fluctuations is obtained after integrating out the short distance modes and adding suitable operators that allow to correctly reconstruct the effect of short distance fluctuations at long distances. A few observables have been computed so far, and the results are extremely promising. I will discuss the formalism and the main results so far.

Tuesday, September 23 & 30 – No talks scheduled at this time

 

 

BCCP events this week

Tuesday, September 16
Speaker: Shea Garrison-Kimmel, Irvine
Location: Hearst Field Annex, B1 (also videoconferenced to 50-5026) – 1:10 pm
Title: “Lessons in Near-Field Cosmology from Simulating the Local Group”
Abstract: Studies of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) galaxies, along with their associated satellites and nearby dwarf galaxies, have proven immensely useful for constraining the cosmology of the Universe, particularly on small scales. I will present a number of simulations, many of which are a part of the ELVIS Suite, cosmological zoom-in simulations of Local Group-like volumes of MW/M31 pairs. Using these, and other simulations, I will highlight existing tensions within the LCDM paradigm, as well as illustrate how simulations can provide links between near-field and deep-field observations.

Wednesday, September 17
Cosmology Talk
Location: LBNL, Director’s Conference Room (50A-5132) – 2 p.m.
Speaker: Leonardo Senatore (Stanford)
Title: “The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures”
Abstract: The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures provides a novel framework to analytically compute the clustering of the Large Scale Structures in the weakly non-linear regime in a consistent and reliable way. The theory that describes the long wavelength fluctuations is obtained after integrating out the short distance modes and adding suitable operators that allow to correctly reconstruct the effect of short distance fluctuations at long distances. A few observables have been computed so far, and the results are extremely promising. I will discuss the formalism and the main results so far.

 

Events this week

Monday, September 15

Theoretical Astrophysics Seminars
Location: UCB – Hearst Field Annex B5, 12:10 p.m.
Speaker: Jeffrey Fung (U. of Toronto)
Title: “The 3D Flow around Embedded Super-Earths”

4D Seminars
Location: UCB – 402 Old Le Conte, 2:30 p.m.
Speaker: Hojin Yoo (UCB/LBNL)
Title: “Nanoshots from the Crab Pulsar and Schwinger Sparks”

Physics Department Colloquium
Location: UCB, 1 Le Conte Hall – 4:15 p.m.
Speaker: Adrian Lee, UC Berkeley
Title: “Gravitational Lensing and the Search for Inflation in the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization”
Abstract: Observations of temperature fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) have played a central role in establishing our current model of cosmology. The next frontier in CMB observations is the measurement of polarized fluctuations, which could determine (and may have already have) if an epoch of cosmic inflation put the Bang in the Big Bang. Also, measurements of polarized CMB gravitational lensing have the potential to weigh the sum of neutrino masses by their effect on structure formation.
The POLARBEAR experiment has made some of the first measurements of the faint and hard-to-detect polarized gravitational lensing effect of the CMB. I will describe our new measurements and the detector technology we developed to achieve the required sensitivity, as well as the design aspects of the experiment to control systematic errors.
POLARBEAR is also searching for the signature of the Inflation in the early Universe. I will describe the current status of the field, including the recent BICEP2 results and the importance of separating a cosmic signal from galactic foreground emission. In the next few years, the single-telescope POLARBEAR experiment will be expanded to become the Simons Array, consisting of three telescopes. The Simons Array will have higher sensitivity than any current generation experiment, broad frequency coverage to separate galactic foreground emission, and stringent control of systematic errors. Finally, I will discuss long-term plans for CMB polarization measurements focusing on the ground-based CMB-S4 experiment and the LiteBIRD space mission.

Tuesday, September 16

Berkeley Cosmology Seminars
Location: UCB – Hearst Field Annex B1, 1:10 p.m. (also videoconferenced to LBNL 50-5026)
Speaker: Shea Garrison-Kimmel, Irvine
Title: “Lessons in Near-Field Cosmology from Simulating the Local Group”
Abstract: Studies of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) galaxies, along with their associated satellites and nearby dwarf galaxies, have proven immensely useful for constraining the cosmology of the Universe, particularly on small scales. I will present a number of simulations, many of which are a part of the ELVIS Suite, cosmological zoom-in simulations of Local Group-like volumes of MW/M31 pairs. Using these, and other simulations, I will highlight existing tensions within the LCDM paradigm, as well as illustrate how simulations can provide links between near-field and deep-field observations.

String Seminar
Location: UCB – 402 Old Le Conte, 3:40 p.m.
Speaker: Netta Englehardt (UCSB)
Title: “Quantum Extremal Surfaces for Holographic Entanglement Entropy”

Physics Research Progress Meeting – no RPM today

Wednesday, September 17

BOSS Lunch
Location: LBNL, 50B-4205 -noon
Discussion

Particle Theory Seminar
Location: LBNL – 50A-5132, 2:00 p.m.
Speaker:  Leonardo Senatore (Stanford)
Title: “The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures”

Cosmology Talk
Location: LBNL, Director’s Conference Room (50A-5132) – 2 p.m.
Speaker: Leonardo Senatore (Stanford)
Title: “The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures”
Abstract: The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures provides a novel framework to analytically compute the clustering of the Large Scale Structures in the weakly non-linear regime in a consistent and reliable way. The theory that describes the long wavelength fluctuations is obtained after integrating out the short distance modes and adding suitable operators that allow to correctly reconstruct the effect of short distance fluctuations at long distances. A few observables have been computed so far, and the results are extremely promising. I will discuss the formalism and the main results so far.

String Group Meeting – no meeting today

CANDi
Location: LBNL, 50-5026, 3:30 p.m.
Speaker: Discussion

Thursday, September 18

Astronomy Lunch
Location: UCB, B5 Hearst Field Annex – 12:30 p.m.
Speakers: • Evan Kirby (Caltech): The Myth of Lithium-Rich Red Giants / • Paul Duffell (UC Berkeley): Moving Mesh Astrophysics / • Chris Ormel (UC Berkeley): TBD

Astronomy Colloquium
Location: UCB, 2 LeConte Hall, 4:10 p.m.
Speaker: Evan Kirby, Caltech
Title: “Dwarf Galaxies: The Nexus of Dark Matter and Chemical Evolution”
Abstract: The Local Group’s dwarf galaxies are near enough for exquisitely detailed, resolved stellar spectroscopy and diverse enough to conduct experiments on dark matter and chemical evolution. I have collected medium-resolution spectra for thousands of stars in many dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. Innovative techniques applied to these spectra recover velocities precise to a few km/s and detailed abundances precise to 0.1 dex. Although Milky Way satellites and field dwarf galaxies are different in many ways, their velocity dispersions show that both types of galaxy pose a serious challenge to cold dark matter. Both types also obey the same mass-metallicity relation despite the large diversity of star formation histories and detailed abundance ratios. I will show how those detailed abundances reveal the star formation histories. I will closely examine one galaxy, Segue 2, because it is the least massive galaxy known.

Physics Research Progress Meeting
Location: LBNL – 50A-5132, 4:00 p.m.
Speaker: Artur Apresyan (Caltech)
Title: “Calorimeters for Precision Timing Measurements in High Energy Physics
Abstract: Current and future high energy physics particle colliders are capable to provide instantaneous luminosities of 10^34 cm-2s-1 and above. We discuss how timing information with a precision of around 10 ps can aid the reconstruction of the physics events under such challenging conditions. We are currently exploring two alternative techniques, namely a) precision timing detection based on secondary emission with MCP detectors, and b) utilizing bright, fast scintillating materials such as LYSO. We present recent results from of a range of detector geometries performed at the Fermilab test beam facility, where we achieve resolutions around 20-30 psec. Finally, possible applications of precision timing in future high-energy physics experiments are discussed, with a focus on the R&D program of the CMS experiment upgrade for the LHC Phase 2 operations.

Friday, September 19

INPA Seminar – no meeting today

Aspen conference winter 2015

Program and application information coming soon!

Workshops

Aspen Conference

More information to be added soon !

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BCCP Workshop: 5th Essential Cosmology for the Next Generation Meeting

BCCP and the Instituto Avanzado de Cosmologia Mexico held the 5th Essential Cosmology for the Next Generation meeting on January 13-17, 2014, popularly known as Cosmology on the Beach. The conference blends a winter school of lecture courses by world-leading scholars with plenary talks on hot research topics. This year, topics included CMB polarization, gravitational wave cosmology, particle physics, tests of gravity, and statistical and experimental methods.

To see slides from the BCCP/IAC meeting Essential Cosmology for the Next Generation 2014 workshop, please click here.  They are also available on the Presentations Page.

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Link to April 17-19, 2013 Cosmology Beyond the Power Spectrum Workshop