BCCP Seminars

Tuesday, February 3

Location: UCB, 131A Campbell Hall, 1:10 pm
Speaker: Kam Arnold
Title: “Fundamental Physics with Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetry”
Abstract: The polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) offers a unique window onto cosmology that can provide information about neutrinos, dark matter, dark energy, large-scale structure formation, and physics at 10^16 GeV energy scales. Several important measurements of CMB polarization were reported last year, including the first-season results from POLARBEAR. With those measurements, we showed the gravitational lensing of the CMB by large-scale structure using CMB polarization data alone, and a measurement of a non-zero B-mode polarization angular power spectrum. Going forward, our expansion of POLARBEAR – the Simons Array – will produce more precise observations in multiple spectral bands over a large fraction of the sky. The Simons Array, powerful as a standalone experiment, is also a technological pathfinder for both the CMB-S4 experiment described in the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel report, and for the LiteBIRD satellite, which we recently proposed to NASA as a partner mission with JAXA. Together, the Simons Array and LiteBIRD will measure the sum of the neutrino masses with the precision necessary to determine their mass hierarchy, and make a deep search for the inflationary B-mode signal, producing a detection with significance > 10 sigma of the B-modes predicted by all large-field inflation models.

Tuesday, February 10

Location: UCB, 131A Campbell Hall, 1:10 pm
Speaker: Michael Niemack
Title: “Probing fundamental physics and cosmic structure by measuring the CMB”
Abstract: The cosmic microwave background  (CMB) has proven to be a powerful probe of the physics and cosmology of our universe. CMB observations are helping to address fundamental questions, such as the nature of dark energy and dark matter, and are being used to probe the physics of inflation at energies a trillion times higher than the Large Hadron Collider. Recent measurements led to several exciting first detections, including CMB lensing, massive galaxy clusters, the large-scale velocity field, and the “B-mode” component of the polarization field. I will discuss these results, novel superconducting detector and optics instrumentation developed for the 6-meter Atacama Cosmology Telescope, and unique capabilities of the recently-funded Advanced ACTPol project. I will also describe the science potential of next generation observatories, including the ultimate “Stage-IV” CMB survey, and how superconducting detector arrays of the future could revolutionize photon-detection capabilities spanning eight orders of magnitude in wavelength.

Events this week

Monday, January 26

Theoretical Astrophysics Seminars
Location: UCB – 131A Campbell Hall
Speaker: Saul Teukolsky (Cornell)
Title: “Simulations of Black Holes and Neutron Stars”
Abstract: Advanced LIGO will conduct its first science run this summer. One of the prime scientific goals is to detect waves from the coalescence and merger of black holes and neutron stars in binary systems. Confronting such signals with the predictions of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity will be the first real strong-field test of the theory. I will describe the status of numerical simulations of such systems, which have set things up for an epic confrontation between theory and experiment. I will also describe the limitations of current codes for computational astrophysics and the ingredients of a next-generation code for upcoming exascale machines.

4D Seminars
Location: UCB – 402 Old Le Conte, 2:30 p.m.
Speaker: Zoltan Ligeti
Title: “The B -> D(*) tau nu Anomalies: Facts and/or Fictions”

Physics Department Colloquium
Location: UCB - 1 Le Conte Hall, 4:15 p.m
Speaker:  Ehud Altman (Weizmann Institute)
Title: “Frontiers in Many-Body Physics of Atoms”

Tuesday, January 27

Berkeley Cosmology Seminars   - no seminar today

String Seminar
Location: UCB – 402 Old Le Conte, 3:40 p.m.
Speaker: Hong Liu (MIT)
Title: “An Upper Bound on Ballistic Spread of Entanglement”

Physics RPM – no meeting today

Wednesday, January 28

Interdisciplinary Instrumentation Colloquium
Location:  Bldg. 15, Room 253 Conference Room, 12:00 PM
Speaker: Kai Vetter (UCB/LBNL)
Title: Radiation Detection Developments in the Berkeley Applied Nuclear Physics Program
Abstract: Since the discovery of x-rays in 1895 by Wilhelm Röntgen, advances in technologies, scientific discoveries, and applications have driven each other. This relationship remains today and our work in the Berkeley Applied Nuclear Physics Program is an example of it. We develop radiation detection system relevant for applications ranging from fundamental physics to medicine and nuclear security. Specifically with the events of 9/11/2001 and more recently with Fukushima after 3/11/2011, aspects of nuclear security and safety as well as emergency response and recovery have gained importance globally and in our efforts.
I will discuss and motivate some of our recent developments in detection concepts and detector technologies ranging from μm-resolution to square-meter-scale systems, including electron-track based Compton imaging, hand-portable and unmanned aerial system based gamma-ray imagers, or the Nuclear Street View concept.

Particle Theory Seminar
Location: LBNL – 50A-5132, 2:00 p.m.
Speaker: Howard Haber (UCSC)
Title: “Constraints on the Alignment Limit of the MSSM Higgs Sector”

String Group Meeting - no meeting today

CANDi
Location: LBNL, 50-5026 – 3:30 PM
Discussion

Brown Bag Talk Instrumentation Talks
Location: LBNL – 50A, 5132, 4:00 p.m.
Speaker: Michael Smayling (Sr. VP, Tela Innovations, Inc.)
Title: “Hybrid Lithography and 1-D Layout”

Thursday, January 29

Astronomy Dept. Lunch
Location:  UCB, 131 Campbell Hall, 12:30 pm
Featured speakers: * Lauren Weiss (UC Berkeley): Are the Kepler-11 Planets Ultra-Low Density? Constraining the Kepler-11 Planet Masses with Radial Velocities / * Koutarou Kyutoku (U. Wisconsin-Milwaukee): Dynamical Mass Ejection From Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries / Robert Feldmann (UC Berkeley): Dust and Metals in Galaxies – An Equilibrium View on Galaxy Formation

 Astronomy Colloquium
Location: UCB, 2 LeConte Hall, 4:00 p.m.
Speaker: Carolyn Porco (Sackler Lecturer, U. of Colorado – Boulder)
Title: “The Active South Polar Terrain of Enceladus”
Abstract: In 2005, the Cassini mission at Saturn discovered a remarkable and unique geological province at high southern latitudes on the small icy moon, Enceladus. Towering jets of powder-sized, salty ice particles, along with water vapor laced with organic compounds and accompanied by a shocking ~5GW of thermal radiation, vent from four prominent fractures crossing the moon’s 500-km-wide south polar terrain (SPT). These observations, together with gravity data collected by Cassini in the last several years, point a liquid layer beneath the province that supplies the eruptions, but whether or not it is regional or global is not completely certain.
I will present the first comprehensive comparison of the spatial distribution and temporal variability of the geysering, the tidal stresses exerted on the moon by Saturn, and the anomalous thermal emission, and discuss the implications of these findings for the moon’s interior structure. I will also briefly describe the means by which Enceladus supplies material to Saturn’s E ring.

Research Progress Meeting
Location: LBNL – 50A-5132, 4:00 p.m.
Speaker: Sasha Pranko (LBNL)
Title: “Higgs -> tau tau”

Friday, January 30

Physics Special Seminar
Location: LBNL, 50A-5132, 10:30 AM
Speaker: Alain Blondel (U. of Geneva)
Title: “FCC-ee : A First Step in a Long Term Vision for Particle Physics”
Abstract: CERN is undertaking an international design study of Future Circular Colliders of a circumference of ~100km around Geneva. A possible first step is a  high luminosity electron-positron (lepton) collider covering the energy range from the Z pole to above the top threshold, for the study of several TeraZ, okuW, MegaHiggs and Megatops. The ultimate goal is a 100 TeV pp collider. The project will be described with special attention to the electron machine. The combination of the two machines offers a remarkable potential for discoveries, from a blend of precision measurements, high statistics, high energies and sensitivity to very small couplings. In particular the search for sterile right-handed neutrinos (aka neutral heavy leptons) will be shown to reach all the way up to the Z mass.

INPA Seminar – no seminar today

BCCP events this week

The next BCCP event will take place:

Tuesday, February 3

Location: UCB, 131A Campbell Hall, 1:10 pm
Speaker: Kam Arnold
Title: “Fundamental Physics with Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetry”
Abstract: The polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) offers a unique window onto cosmology that can provide information about neutrinos, dark matter, dark energy, large-scale structure formation, and physics at 10^16 GeV energy scales. Several important measurements of CMB polarization were reported last year, including the first-season results from POLARBEAR. With those measurements, we showed the gravitational lensing of the CMB by large-scale structure using CMB polarization data alone, and a measurement of a non-zero B-mode polarization angular power spectrum. Going forward, our expansion of POLARBEAR – the Simons Array – will produce more precise observations in multiple spectral bands over a large fraction of the sky. The Simons Array, powerful as a standalone experiment, is also a technological pathfinder for both the CMB-S4 experiment described in the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel report, and for the LiteBIRD satellite, which we recently proposed to NASA as a partner mission with JAXA. Together, the Simons Array and LiteBIRD will measure the sum of the neutrino masses with the precision necessary to determine their mass hierarchy, and make a deep search for the inflationary B-mode signal, producing a detection with significance > 10 sigma of the B-modes predicted by all large-field inflation models.


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