Events this week

Monday, March 23

Theoretical Astrophysics Seminars – no seminar  due to Spring Break

4D Seminar - no seminar due to Spring Break

Physics Department Colloquium – no seminar due to Spring Break

Tuesday, March 24

Berkeley Cosmology Seminars - no seminar due to Spring break

String Seminar – no seminar due to Spring Break

Physics RPM
Location: LBNL – 50A-5132, 4:00 p.m.
Speaker: Jean Paul Chou (Rutgers)
Title: “CMS Run 2 Preparations”

Wednesday, March 25

BOSS lunch
Location: LBNL – noon
Speaker: tba

Particle Theory Seminarno seminar due to Spring Break

CANDi
Location: LBNL, 50-5026 – 3:30 PM

Discussion: Matter power spectrum and the challenge of percent accuracy, ArXiv #: 1503.05920 / Redshift-space equal-time angular-averaged consistency relations of the gravitational dynamics, ArXiv #: 1503.06036 /Emulating the CFHTLenS Weak Lensing data: Cosmological Constraints from moments and Minkowski functionals, ArXiv #: 1503.06214

String Group Meeting – no  meeting due to Spring Break

Thursday, March 26

Astronomy Dept. Lunch – no lunch this week

Astronomy Colloquium – no colloquium due to Spring Break

Research Progress Meeting – no RPM today

Friday, March 27

INPA Seminar
Location: LBNL – INPA Common Room (50-5026), 12:00 p.m.
Speaker:  Irshad Mohammed (Zurich)
Title:  “Towards precision cosmology: the halo model and necessary modifications
Abstract:  There are several approaches to account for clustering of matter and its evolution in the Universe. One of the more successful frameworks is the halo model. In this approach, all the matter in the Universe is assumed to be in isolated haloes with mass defined by a threshold density. Despite its success over a decade and physical motivation, this approach is limited by its accuracy and precision. I will present necessary modifications in the halo model in order to achieve desired accuracy and precision in the underlying statistics of the distribution of matter, so called matter power spectrum, and to the extension weak lensing applications. Along with the non-linear clustering of dark matter, I will also target the corrections due to baryonic physics at small scales, full covariance matrix of the matter power spectrum and finally the cosmological implications due to these corrections.

BCCP Seminars

Tuesday, March 31

Location: UC Berkeley, Campbell Hall, 131A, 1:10 pm
Speaker: Andrew Pontzen, UCL
Title: “How the large-scale Lyman-alpha forest will tell us about the galaxy luminosity function”
Abstract:  I will introduce a surprising relationship between the Lyman-alpha forest large-scale power spectrum and the luminosity function of galaxies and quasars [arXiv 1402.0506]. The forest is generally assumed to be a tracer of total matter on large scales but I will show how the assumed link between the dark and observable universe is substantially modified by radiative transfer effects. Future dark energy surveys like DESI will therefore present novel opportunities to learn more about the source of ionising photons in our universe [arXiv 1407.6367].

 

 

BCCP events this week

Tuesday, March 31

Location: UC Berkeley, Campbell Hall, 131A, 1:10 pm
Speaker: Andrew Pontzen, UCL
Title: “How the large-scale Lyman-alpha forest will tell us about the galaxy luminosity function”
Abstract: I will introduce a surprising relationship between the Lyman-alpha forest  large-scale power spectrum and the luminosity function of galaxies and quasars [arXiv 1402.0506]. The forest is generally assumed to be a tracer of total matter on large scales but I will show how the assumed link between the dark and observable universe is substantially modified by radiative transfer effects. Future dark energy surveys like DESI will therefore present novel opportunities to learn more about the source of ionising photons in our universe [arXiv 1407.6367].

 


CTU2015 Schedule

CtU2015 registration